Canada Summer Jobs Overview

Canada Summer Jobs Overview

This guide will help you to complete your Canada Summer Jobs Application.

Before you submit your funding application, make sure to read the Articles of Agreement and the Guide. They contain crucial information about the supporting documentation Service Canada needs to evaluate your application.

Canada Summer Jobs program objectives

Canada Summer Jobs is a program of the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy. It aims to offer flexible and holistic services that help young Canadians gain the skills and experience they need to transition successfully into the labour market.

These objectives align with the newly redesigned Youth Employment and Skills Strategy and Canada Summer Jobs program:

  • Youth can have high-quality work experiences
  • Respond to national and regional priorities to increase access to the labour markets for youth facing unique barriers
  • Offer youth the opportunity to learn and improve their skills

Employers from the public, private, and not-for profit sectors can receive wage subsidies. This program is intended to provide quality summer work experiences for youth aged 15-30 years. The eligibility of participants is not limited to students.

The Government of Canada is committed to ensuring that the youth jobs funded by the program are in safe, inclusive, healthy, and non-discriminatory work environments. Service Canada uses the Application Form to collect information about your organization, including your health and safety practices, work environments policies, supervision and mentor plans, skills development plans, and any other details that are relevant to your company and the job(s) you are applying for. See Section 5 – Apply for more information about the information that was collected during the application process.

To assist you in submitting your complete application, the Applicant Guide and Application Form have been updated.

Canada Summer Jobs 2021

Flexibilities for Employers

The Department created temporary flexibilities for CSJ 2020 to address the needs of youth and employers in the context COVID-19. These temporary flexibilities will be available for 2021 to help youth and employers. These temporary flexibilities will apply to CSJ 2021

Wage subsidies: Employers in the public or private sectors that are funded by the government will be eligible for a reimbursement of up 75% of their hourly minimum wage. Regular rules stipulate that private and public sector employers can only receive 50% of the provincial/territorial minimum wage.

Part-time employment: All employers that are funded may offer part time placements (e.g., less than 30 hours per week). All CSJ-funded employment must be full time, with a minimum of 30 hours per work week.

Employment period: All employers that are funded may offer job placements from April 26 to February 26, 2021. All CSJ-funded jobs must be completed in the summer months, as per regular rules.

Modifications to project or job activities: After an agreement has been signed, all funded employers can amend project or job activities if COVID-19 restrictions are applied. Service Canada should be contacted in such cases to discuss possible amendments. Service Canada must approve all changes.

How to submit your application

There are many ways to submit your application:

  • Fill out an online application
  • Online Grants and Contributions Online Services (GCOS)
  • In person; and
  • Mail.

For more information on these application methods, please refer to Section of Apply below.

Important dates

These are the key dates to keep in mind:

  • Applications are due February 3, 2021
  • The earliest date for job starts is April 26, 2021
  • The latest job opening date is January 15, 2022
  • The latest job deadline is February 26, 2022

The latest time to submit a claim for payment is within 30 days of the Canada Summer Jobs-funded placement.

Important: Before your project has been approved, and both the recipient of the grant and Service Canada have signed an agreement, activities cannot start. Service Canada does not consider receipt of an application as a guarantee of funding. You should not assume any obligation on the part Service Canada until funding has already been approved and a formal agreement signed by a Service Canada representative.

Also Read: Canada’s worker rights

Notification of the results

Every year, the number of applications for funding exceeds the amount available. Oversubscription means that not all eligible projects will be funded. Organizations that are eligible for funding may not be able to receive the requested amount, previous funding, or the requested number of weeks. In 2020, the average funded job lasted 8 weeks and 35 hours per work week.

The successful applicants are awarded funds based on Service Canada’s evaluation of their applications and the feedback received by members of Parliament during the review of each constituency’s list of eligible projects for funding.

Service Canada will notify you about the status of your request beginning in April 2021. All funding and eligibility decisions will be made in writing. If you have applied through GCOS, you can check the status of your request via GCOS.

Service Canada will ask youth participants and funded employers to fill out questionnaires about their Canada Summer Jobs experiences. Before submitting a claim for payment, the mandatory employer questionnaire must also be completed. Employers must also provide the questionnaire for youth participants to youth workers funded by Canada Summer Jobs, though it is voluntary. Both questionnaires will also be sent to the funded employers during notification.

Job Bank will remain the main source of information for youth about the available positions through the program. All Canada Summer Jobs-funded jobs will be automatically posted to Job Bank. This is to assist youth in finding and employers in filling those positions.

2. High quality job placements (Section 2)

What makes a job placement quality?

Canada Summer Jobs Program: The Government of Canada offers wage subsidies to employers in order to provide quality placements for youth in safe, inclusive, and healthy work environments, free from harassment and discrimination.

Your application should reflect the quality of the job you are applying for.

  • Youth Investment – Paying youth more than the minimum wage in your territory or province, or committing to keep the youth employed beyond the CSJ Agreement.
  • Supervision – This is when you show how you will support youth while they work by observing, evaluating and giving feedback on job performance.
  • Mentoring – showing how your guidance can support the professional and personal development of the youth.
  • Skills Development – Youth can acquire the skills they need to work.
  • Safety and health practices – show that you have taken safety measures in your workplace.

Employers are responsible in the current COVID-19 context for keeping informed about provincial guidance on essential services, municipal, provincial, and federal public information and following any local health guidance.

  • Policies and practices for a safe work environment – show that you have taken steps to ensure that your workplace is free from harassment and discrimination.

These are some examples of projects that fulfill the objectives of this program. They provide high-quality work placements for youth and provide opportunities for them to learn and improve their skills.

Here are some examples of high-quality projects

1. Church Daycare

Four recent immigrants will be hired by a local church to work at the daycare center in summer to care for children.

All faiths are welcome and the church is open to all.

Youth will organize and deliver a special project for children over the summer. Youth will be responsible for both an educational and recreational component that is not part of the regular day-to-day operations of the church. Over several weeks, the recreational component will include an introduction of various summer sports as well as a competition.

The youth workers will assist the children in learning more about Canada, their countries of heritage, as well as the other countries.

The youth will learn how to care for children and how to plan and create projects. They will also be able to offer educational and recreational activities. The employer may retain youth who have had a positive experience and want to pursue a career in Early Childhood Education.

This project would be awarded additional points if it meets one of the national priorities. For more information, see Section 4 Assessment Criteria.

2. Youth with Disabilities

Camp counselors are needed by a non-profit organization that operates a summer camp for youth with disabilities.

Counselors will provide support to campers by providing various support based on their individual needs. Senior camp leaders will supervise the counselors on a daily basis. The supervision will include daily meetings and regular health and safety training. Every youth who is hired will receive mentoring one-on-one throughout the summer.

This project would be awarded additional points if it meets one of the national priorities. For more information, see Section 4 Assessment Criteria.

3. Official Language Minority Community

An organization that is francophone seeks to hire three youths who will provide guides services for tourists visiting the French quarter of the city. This community is mainly English-speaking. These services will help support many francophone museums and historical sites.

These sites will continue to operate and offer guided tours to tourists and school groups throughout the day. This will allow the community to preserve its French linguistic vitality. The youth will be able to communicate in French and support their francophone peers.

This project would be awarded additional points if it meets one of the national priorities.

For more information about determining whether your community is an Official Language Minority Community see Section 4 Assessment Criteria. Online, you can find a list of all communities.

4. Environmental Conservation

A youth is needed to help with ongoing research and development activities for a company that develops clean-air technology.

The company plans to hire an environmental engineering student to be an assistant to an experienced engineer. The youth will assist in testing and research, while the experienced engineer will mentor them to help develop their skills and career.

This project would be awarded additional points if it meets one of the national priorities. For more information, see Section 4 Assessment Criteria.

5. Small Business

Local restaurant will hire youth to help with shipping and processing orders during the summer months.

Youth will be assigned to small groups and work together to plan and execute deliveries. They will be responsible for maintaining accurate records. The supervisor will provide in-person training for the youth, and then they will be assigned a mentor to help them through the rest of their placement. The youth will receive guidance on client service and how to social distancing professionally. The youth will learn how to create work plans together and gain experience in client service by coordinating drop-offs.

This project would be awarded additional points if it meets one of the national priorities. For more information, see Section 4 Assessment Criteria.

3. Screening to determine eligibility (section 3)

Your application will be:

  • Checked for eligibility against each of the mandatory eligibility requirements below.
  • Qualitative evaluation in relation to program objectives
  • Offer quality work experiences to youth
  • Offer youth opportunities to learn and improve their skills.
  • To improve the access of youth with unique barriers to the labour market, respond to both national and local priorities
  • Only if you have met all eligibility requirements will your project be considered.

When determining eligibility for your application, the Department can review the results of previous funding agreements and information in public domain. This includes materials on your website or media articles. Canada Summer Jobs 2021: The Department will review all applications, correspondence and responses, including any requests for clarification or missing information, in order to determine eligibility.

Review of Members of Parliament

After Service Canada officials have ranked all eligible applications and assessed them, members of parliament are given a list with eligible projects for their constituencies. They also have the option to give feedback based upon their local knowledge.

Check out the list of 15 eligibility requirements

To be eligible for funding, your project must meet the 15 eligibility requirements. If your project does not meet the 15 eligibility requirements, it won’t be considered eligible for funding.

  • The application is expected to be submitted before deadline.
  • The Attestation Box must be checked.
  • Complete application is required.
  • Eligible employer must be
  • Eligible activities are required for all project activities.
  • Duration of the job: Between 6 and 23 weeks consecutively
  • Hours of work: Part-time, full-time (from 12 to 40 hours per week).
  • Other sources of funding: It is important to declare whether you have applied for, will apply for, or received funding from any other source in order to do the job.
  • Salary: Your salary must be in line with the minimum wage requirements of your territory or province.
  • Money owing the Government of Canada: You must declare all money owed to the Government of Canada.
  • Safety and health: You must show that you have taken appropriate measures to ensure youth are aware of safety and health practices at work. Safety measures should be specific to the job and type of activity.
  • Work environment and hiring practices: You must show that you have taken appropriate measures to ensure that your work environment and hiring practices are free from harassment and discrimination.
  • Supervision: The supervision plan must be outlined for the youth, as well as the job options.
  • Mentoring: The mentor must create a mentoring plan for the youth.
  • Past results: The Department may review your files to determine if any evidence is available from past agreements. This includes financial irregularities, safety concerns, and past project results. Canada Summer Jobs 2021: The Department will review all applications, correspondence and responses, including any requests for clarification or missing information, in order to complete this review. On past financial irregularities, the Department can consult with Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

Service Canada will contact applicants if they are unable to provide the required information or if there is any confusion in the application. This will allow them to determine if your application is eligible. You must reply within five business days after receiving such a letter. Failure to reply within the timeframe will result in the application being denied.

In the evaluation of your application, any failure to meet the conditions of a previously-funded project will be taken into consideration. This could lead to a decision of ineligibility of the new application.

Important: Please review Section 5, “How to Write Your Application”, for more information about the requirements for each item.

Information about eligibility

Who can apply?

Not-for-profit employers

The “not-for profit” category includes entities that are not for financial gain. This category includes:

  • Community, charitable, or voluntary organizations, as well as faith-based organizations (for instance, churches, synagogues and temples, mosques).
  • As well as professional and industry organizations, associations of workers or employers
  • Indigenous not-for-profit organizations;
  • Non-governmental organizations
  • Unions
  • Sector councils;
  • Non-profit Band Councils

Employers in the public sector

Public sector employees include those in public health, public education institutions, and municipal governments. This category also includes:

  • Vocational schools and public community colleges;
  • Public health, including public hospitals, nursing homes, senior citizen homes, rehabilitation homes;
  • Universities and colleges that offer public degrees;
  • Authorities and municipal governments, as well as regional legislative bodies and department;
  • Schools boards, elementary and secondary schools; and
  • Territorial governments

Private sector employers

Private sector entities are created to make a profit, or provide economic benefits to their owners, members, or shareholders. To be eligible for CSJ funding, private sector employers must employ 50 full-time workers in Canada. Full-time employees work 30 hours per week or more.

This category includes:

  • Bodies, whether incorporated or not; partnerships and sole proprietorships.
  • Financial Institutions
  • Businesses, whether unincorporated or incorporated, that include
  • Federal Crown corporations that operate in a competitive environment, and are not dependent on appropriations to operating purposes as specified in Schedule III, Part 2 of the Financial Administration Act.
  • Recognized by the Crown corporations of provincial and territorial jurisdictions as operating in a competitive climate and not normally dependent on appropriations for operational purposes.
  • Private health care and educational institutions
  • Independent franchise owners (franchise operator) are eligible if 50 or less full-time employees work full-time in the franchisee’s operation across Canada. This applies regardless of how many business numbers are involved.
  • Indian Band corporations
  • Private Band Councils
  • Private colleges and universities

Employers not eligible

  • Members of the Senate and the House of Commons;
  • Federal Government Departments and Agencies
  • Provincial Departments and Agencies
  • Organisations engaging in partisan political activity

Which projects are eligible?

All projects funded must be eligible for the program and meet the conditions of the Articles of Agreement between the Department of Finance and the organization. Failure to comply with these conditions will result in the organization not being reimbursed for the youth’s salaries. False or misleading information could affect your eligibility, and you may lose funding.

Eligible projects

  • For a minimum of six weeks, provide full-time or partial work experience in Canada between April 26 2021 and February 26, 20,22.
  • Offer a job experience in an inclusive, non-discriminatory workplace that respects all Canadians’ rights;
  • Development and support skills acquisition

Ineligible jobs and projects

  • Activities that are not located in Canada, but which make up projects
  • Activities that provide a personal service for the employer
  • Political activities of the Partisans
  • Activities to raise funds for youth participants’ salaries;

These projects or jobs are:

  • You may not be able to access programs, services or employment.
  • Advocate intolerance, discrimination, and/or prejudice
  • Actively work to restrict or undermine a woman’s ability to access sexual and reproductive health services
  • These definitions are important:

According to section 2.1 of Canada Summer Jobs Articles of Agreement “project” refers to the hiring, administration, and job activities of a job activity or organization as defined in the Application Agreement.

Advocate is to encourage, foster, or actively support intolerance and discrimination.

“Undermine or restrict” is to limit or weaken a woman’s access to sexual and reproductive health services. According to the Government of Canada, sexual and reproductive services include comprehensive sexuality education, family planning and prevention of sexual and gender-based violence. They also provide safe and legal abortions and post-abortion care.

Which youth participants are eligible?

For youth to be eligible, they must:

At the time of employment, you must be between 15-30 years old

Canadian citizen, permanent resident or person to whom refugee status has been granted under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act during the employment**

At the time of employment, you must have a valid Social Security Number and be legally allowed to work in Canada according to applicable provincial or territorial legislation.

*The youth must have reached 15 years old at the start of the employment period. As long as the youth is not older than 30, the youth can be employed for more than 30 days.

**International students cannot participate. Anyone who is temporarily in Canada to study and is not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, as well as anyone who has been granted refugee status here in Canada, is considered an international student. Ineligible are youth who are awaiting a ruling on refugee status, those with a temporary visitor visa, youth or work visa. Canada Summer Jobs is designed to help youth enter the Canadian labour market. However, due to the nature of international students’ temporary stay in Canada, it does not permit for long-term connections to the labour market.

Additional conditions for youth eligibility

Section 13.1(a), Articles of Agreement states that youth employed for Canada Summer Jobs funded jobs cannot replace or displace existing employees or volunteers. This includes employees who have been laid off and are awaiting recall, employees absent because of an industrial dispute, vacation employees, and employees on maternity leave or parental leave.

The Agreement provides that the Employer will not reimburse any costs incurred in connection to a Participant who is either a member of its Immediate family or a direct relative of the Employer. The costs could be eligible for reimbursement if Canada agrees in writing prior to the start of the Job that Canada is satisfied that the Participant’s hiring was not due to favouritism because of being a member of the Immediate family of the Employer, officer, or director.

CSJ Program funding can’t be used to self-employment. The employer must establish a relationship with the youth participant as an employer-employee.

Service Canada can answer any questions you may have about your eligibility for youth status.

What are the eligible costs?

Contribution to the wage

Employers that are not for profit can receive funding up to 100% of the minimum hourly wage in their province or territory. Not-for-profit businesses are also eligible to receive reimbursement for Mandatory Employment Related costs. Both public and private sector employers can receive funding up to 75% off the minimum hourly wage in their province or territory. You can request CSJ funding for less than the minimum wage, provided that provincial or territorial legislation allows it.

You are encouraged to offer a longer-term position and pay more than the minimum wage to improve the quality of your work placement. However, the reimbursement will only apply to the provincial or territorial adult minimum hourly wage at the time of employment. If a private employer pays $16.00 an hour to a youth in a province where $15.00 is the minimum hourly wage, 75% of that $15.00 ($11.25) will be reimbursed.

Below is the table that shows the minimum hourly wage in each province or territory as of the publication of this Applicant guide. You are responsible for verifying the minimum wage at the point of employment. Each week of compensation will be based on the week’s minimum wage.

Mandatory Employment Related Costs

The law requires employers to pay the following:

  • Employment Insurance premiums, Canada or Quebec Pension Plan contributions;
  • Vacation pay
  • Premiums for Workers’ Compensation or equivalent liability insurance (if applicable).
  • Health Services Fund, Quebec parental insurance premiums, and Commission des normes, de l’equite, de la sante et de la securite du travail in Quebec;
  • Newfoundland & Labrador Health and Post-Secondary Education tax
  • Manitoba Health and Post-Secondary Education Levy; and
  • British Columbia’s Employer Health Tax and any applicable taxes

The CRA website has the tables for payroll deductions. To ensure the most current rate information, check with the relevant provincial or territorial authorities.

Non-profit employers can be reimbursed for MERCs up to 100% of the minimum wage in the territory or province where the activities are taking place. The reimbursement of MERCs is not available to employers in the public or private sectors.

Workers’ Compensation Benefits

The Articles of Agreement stipulate that youth must have Workers’ Compensation or an equivalent liability insurance. Your insurer should confirm that your current equivalent liability insurance (and auto insurance if applicable), covers all activities undertaken by youth, and all locations in which these activities take place. Not-for-profit employers can be reimbursed for Workers’ Compensation or Liability Insurance costs in all provinces or territories.

Youth with disabilities: Overhead costs

Service Canada understands that people with disabilities may face additional obstacles to entering the workforce. You may be eligible to receive additional funding to help the youth with disabilities in the workplace.

The eligibility of overhead costs is determined on a case by case basis. Eligible overhead costs may include adaptations, personal tools, and professional support services (for instance, visual language interpreters). For more details, please refer to Section 23.0 of Articles of Agreement (Disposition of assets) and contact Service Canada.

Advances

Section 6 of the Canada Summer Jobs Articles of Agreement outlines the conditions for advances. Maximum advance of 75% of total agreement value is allowed.

Important: Before Service Canada can issue an advance check, applicants must complete the Employer Declaration and Employee Declaration forms. This form must be filled out on the first day of employment and returned to Service Canada within seven working days.

Service Canada will validate your CRA business name, address and primary contact information before issuing a payment.

Work hours and duration

The CSJ-funded part of the job must last between six and twenty-three weeks. These weeks are usually consecutive.

The approved number of weeks must be worked. Employment of less than six weeks may be considered ineligible. Expenses will not be reimbursed. Special circumstances may allow for exceptions.

Part-time and full-time jobs can be offered from a minimum 12 hours to a maximum 40 hours per week. You may not be eligible for reimbursement if you work less than 12 hours per week.

The number of applications and the availability of funding may mean that the agreement is for fewer jobs, weeks, or hours per week than was requested in the application.

Process for Canada Express Entry Immigration Program

4. Criteria for assessment (Section 4)

Your application will be evaluated for quality using the information provided.

  1. Offer quality work experiences to youth
  2. Give youth the opportunity to learn and improve their skills.
  3. To improve the access of youth with unique barriers to the labour market, respond to both national and local priorities

Assessment is carried out on a constituency-by-constituency basis.

Goal 1: Youth have quality work experiences (30 points).

These criteria will be used to evaluate the quality of your work experience.

The salary for the job(s) is higher than the minimum wage in the province or territory. (10 points).

For more information about the minimum wage, refer to Section 3 – Screening and Eligibility. You will need to report the minimum wage paid to youth as part the mandatory reporting process.

After the Canada Summer Jobs agreement ends, you intend to keep the youth employed. (5 points).

You can do this additional work part-time or full-time. You will need to report whether the youth was retained as part of the mandatory reporting process.

Supervision will be provided for the youth. (15 points).

Plan for Supervision

Your supervision plan should be task-oriented, and focussed on the job activities listed in your application.

You must submit each of these mandatory pieces of information in order to be eligible:

The title of supervisor

Nature of Supervision (Onsite, Remote, or Combination);

Frequency of supervision (daily, weekly, less than once per week).

Please use the check boxes provided on the application form to provide additional information.

The supervisor’s supervisory experience (Less then one year, One-to two years or More than two years).

Type of feedback that will be provided to youth (Formal and Informal);

What the supervisor will do (Job-specific Training, Work Instructions and Tasks, Evaluation of Work, and Other)

For more information, see Section 5 – Apply.

Goal 2: Give youth the opportunity to learn and improve their skills (45 Points)

Mentoring will be provided to the youth. (15 points).

Mentoring plan

Mentoring is an interaction between an experienced employee (the mentor), and a less-experienced employee (the youth). Regular meetings will allow the mentor to learn about the career goals of the youth. They also share their professional experiences to support their skills development, help them enter the labour market, and facilitate their professional growth.

You must submit each of these mandatory pieces of information in order to be eligible:

Titular of mentor

Type (One-on-one, Team);

Frequency of mentoring (Weekly or Monthly, less than once per month)

Please use the check boxes provided on the application form to provide additional information.

The mentor’s experience (less than one year, less than one to two years or more than two years).

Mentor-mentee relationship (Formal, Informal);

What the mentor will offer (Support for skill development, Career-related Training, Access to learning materials or Other)

For more information, see Section 5 – Apply.

You should identify the skills you will develop during your work placement. You must clearly describe the job tasks and responsibilities you will choose to develop the skills. (30 points).

These skills are listed on the application form:

Client service: This refers to being able to communicate professionally and efficiently with clients. Client service skills are essential for employers to communicate with clients.

Teamwork is the ability to work with others. People work together in teams, small or large, to coordinate tasks, manage resources, plan, make decisions and negotiate solutions.

Communication is the ability to share thoughts and information with others. Communication can be done orally through speaking, listening, and using nonverbal cues such as body language, or in writing. Communication skills are used at work to communicate with customers, talk with suppliers, explain work procedures, and participate in virtual sales meetings.

Digital skills: These are the skills required to use and understand digital tools, applications and systems as well as to process digital information. People use digital technology skills at work to input, access and analyze data, create, organize and communicate information using computers, software and point-of-sale devices, email, podcasts and web applications, as well as other digital devices.

Leadership is a combination of communication, honesty and relationship building. It also requires the ability to delegate. Leadership skills are essential for work. They include the ability to lead a team and take responsibility for tasks that involve multiple employees.

Other: You can list any other skills you will develop.

Goal 3: Respond to national or local priorities in order to increase access to the labour markets for youth who are facing unique barriers (25 points).

National Priorities (15 points).

To help the program reach its goals of helping young people transition to the labour force, especially those who face barriers to employment, national priorities were established.

Please indicate the national priorities that your project supports. If you can demonstrate that your application meets more than one of these national priorities, you will receive additional points.

Canada Summer Jobs 2021 National Priorities:

Organisations that offer services to youth who identify as belonging to underrepresented groups, or have additional barriers to entry or staying in the labor market.

New immigrant/refugee youth (nouveau is defined as someone who has arrived in Canada within the last 5 years).

Indigenous youth

Youth who haven’t completed high school

Visible minorities/racialized youth

LGBTQ2 youth

Women in science, technology engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

Youth who have never been employed before and would like to start their job.

You will be required to make every effort to recruit a priority youth, and to keep records of these efforts. If your application is approved, your recruitment plans and hiring plans will be reviewed to ensure they are consistent with what you have stated.

Opportunities provided by organizations that offer services to persons with disabilities, or who intend to hire youth with disability;

Employers who provide services for youth with disabilities, or express an intent to hire them, will receive additional points.

If your organization has expressed the intention to hire a young person under this priority, you will need to make every effort to recruit a young person with disabilities. You must also document and report these efforts. If your application is approved, your hiring and recruitment plans will be reviewed to verify that they are consistent with what you have stated.

Opportunities for youth in rural communities (RAs), remote areas, or Official Language Minority Communitiess (OLMCs);

Employers who provide jobs in areas that are geographically marginalized, such as rural or remote communities, will receive additional points.

Rural and Remote Communities: According to Statistics Canada, a rural community is one with less than 1,000 inhabitants and a population density of below 400 people per square mile. A remote area is one that is not in a metropolitan area. Service Canada can help you determine if your community falls under the category of remote or rural. Service Canada will confirm your classification during assessment.

Employers who are committed to hiring members of the OLMC or offering services or support to these communities will receive additional points.

OLMC: An officially-language minority can be either a French-speaker, French-speaking, or English-speaker living in Quebec. In Quebec, English is the predominant language. Online, you can find a list of these communities.

Opportunities for organizations that are concerned with conserving and protecting the environment.

Employers who offer jobs in industries and sectors that help to preserve and conserve the environment or assist with the transition to low-carbon emission economies will receive additional points.

Employers impacted by COVID-19, mainly small businesses, offer opportunities in recognition of their contributions to the creation and retention of jobs.

Small businesses with 50 or fewer full time employees will receive additional points if they have been affected by COVID-19.

Priorities Local (10 points)

Each constituency is given local priorities by members of parliament throughout the country, taking into consideration information from the labour market.

Please indicate the local priorities that your project supports. This link contains the local priorities for your area. Additional points will be given to applicants who demonstrate that their application meets more than one local priority.

It is not required for Members of Parliament establish local priorities. If your Member of Parliament does not establish local priorities, you will not be penalized in the assessment.

5. Apply process (Section 5)

The deadline for applications has been extended to February 3, 2020 at 12:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time.

Notifications received after the deadline date or applications not postmarked by that date will be rejected.

How to submit your application

There are many ways to submit your application:

  • Fill out an online application
  • Online Services for Grants and Contributions
  • In person
  • By mail

As COVID-19 office closures could impact your ability to submit applications in person or via mail, it is best to submit your application electronically.

Notifications received via email or fax will not be accepted.

1. Online fillable application

Online applications are possible.

Important technical information:

The fillable form can be accessed for 20 hours. It will expire if you don’t complete it in the given time frame.

Your application cannot be saved or accessed later.

Before submitting your application online, you can print a duplicate of it for your records.

Notice:

To complete your application, you must click “submit” on the screen after “print”. Your application will not be processed if you don’t click “submit”.

Confirmation of receipt: After a fillable application is submitted successfully, the system immediately generates a confirmation number. This confirmation is the acknowledgment of receipt of your request. A confirmation of receipt will be sent to you by email. You have not submitted the application correctly if you don’t receive a confirmation number.

2. 2. Online services

Register with ESDC’s Grants and Contributions Online Services. Although it takes a few weeks to create a GCOS account, it is a quick and easy process.

Using GCOS, you can apply for funding opportunities through ESDC via secure web environments. GCOS lets you submit and track your applications, sign agreements, manage active project statuses, submit supporting documents, review past projects submitted through GCOS, and even submit new ones.

To apply for future funding opportunities, create your GCOS account before you need it. Your account will be available to you 24/7, including mobile access.

For step-by-step instructions on how to create an account, visit the GCOS website.

Access GCOS is the best place to go if you already have a GCOS account.

Confirmation of receipt: After a GCOS request has been submitted successfully, a confirmation number is generated immediately by the system. This confirmation is considered to be an acknowledgment of receipt. A confirmation of receipt will be sent to you by email. You have not submitted the application correctly if you don’t receive a confirmation number.

3. In person

You must submit your application before the closing of the Service Canada Office on February 3, 2020. For information on the Service Canada Office hours, please visit the Service Canada website. Additional administrative delays may apply.

You should submit your application electronically via the online fillable form or GCOS. In case of COVID-19 office closures, the ability to submit applications in person may be affected.

Confirmation of receipt: Within 10 business days, you will receive an acknowledgement acknowledging receipt. This confirmation should be kept as it is necessary for any future communication with Service Canada.

4. Mail:

You must postmark your application by February 3, 2021. For the address to which your application should be sent, visit the Canada Summer Jobs website. Additional administrative delays may apply.

You should submit your application electronically via the online fillable form or GCOS, as you may lose the ability to send a paper application due to office closings for COVID-19.

Confirmation of receipt: Within 10 business days, you will receive an acknowledgement acknowledging receipt. This confirmation should be kept as it is necessary for any future communication with Service Canada.

Service Canada will only accept one copy of your application. Multiple copies of the same applicant or submissions using different methods can lead to longer processing times.

How to write a successful application

Before you begin

This section contains important information about the supporting documentation and information we need to evaluate your application. Fill out the application form with your answers and attach the required documents. All fields must be filled in.

Before you submit your application, please read the Articles of Agreement and this applicant guide. This Guide will help you understand the process of assessing your application.

Although the order of the questions might differ between paper and online applications, it is necessary to provide the same information.

The following information is required to complete your application:

  • Your legal name;
  • If your legal name is different, you can use the common name of your company.
  • Number of CRA business;
  • The email address of the representative from the employer
  • Your postal address
  • Canada: Number of full-time workers;
  • Date when your organization was founded

Constituency

The constituency in which your application will be evaluated is determined by the location of the proposed activities and not the address or location of your organization. If all jobs are in the same constituency, you only need to fill out one application. Service Canada will combine multiple applications from the same constituency.

If you apply for multiple jobs in the same constituency, you must complete a separate application. The Elections Canada website can help you determine which constituency the activities will be held.

Information to be made public

Service Canada will publish the contact information of approved employers for funding on the Government of Canada’s CSJ site.

Service Canada will also post any CSJ-funded positions online at Job Bank.

This applicant guide and the application form indicate which information will be made public. When completing your application, please pay attention to these details. Service Canada can answer any questions you may have about information that will be made public.

Part A – Information for employers

Enter the information about your organization.

1. Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) business number

Enter the 15-character RP business number (payroll) assigned by CRA to your organization. If your business employs employees, you will need an RP account with CRA. Prior to hiring youth under the Canada Summer Jobs program, you will need an RP business number.

Notice:

A business number is required to complete the online application via GCOS, or the online form. Visit the CRA website to obtain a business number. You can also use the paper application form if you don’t have a business number. Before your application is approved for funding, however, you must obtain a CRA Business Number.

2. legal name of the organization

Enter the legal name of the organization that is associated to your CRA business number. If the acronym is used, please enter it in its entirety.

Your application will be approved if you sign the agreement. Any payments will be sent to the legal name. Only the first 44 characters of your legal name will be used to make payments.

3. If different from the legal name, operating (common) name

You can enter the common name of the organization, which may differ from the legal name. If the acronym is used, please enter it in its entirety.

Youth can access this information publicly via the CSJ website.

4. Enter the phone number of your company.

Youth can access this information publicly via the CSJ website if they have any questions about the Job Bank and job placement.

5. Type of organization

Choose the one that best describes your company. If a CRA-registered non-profit organization is not for profit, the type of employer it is will be determined by its source of operating revenues and the person to whom it must report its activities. A not-for profit that receives most of its revenue from government sources could be considered “public” in order to apply for CSJ funding. This would include a municipal library.

6. Organization email address

Enter your organization’s email address.

Youth can access this information publicly via the CSJ website if they have any questions about the Job Bank and job placement.

7. (a) Name of employer representative and title

Service Canada must have contact with your organization’s representative regarding your application and any subsequent agreement during the placement. They can also discuss questions regarding payment claims. The applicant and proposed activities must be provided to this individual.

7.  (b) Telephone number of employer representative

Enter the phone number of the representative for your organization.

8. Email address of employer representative

You should keep this email address updated as it will be used for information about CSJ and your application. This includes the outcome of your assessment.

Notice:

Service Canada will send mandatory reports to this email address during and after the agreement. You should monitor your inbox regularly for junk mail and spam.

9. Preferred language of communication

Choose the language you would like to communicate in and the language you wish for correspondence to be received.

10. Year of establishment

Input the year, month, and day when your company began to operate.

11. Describe your organization’s activities

Give a summary of the activities of your organization.

12. Number of full-time employees working in Canadian locations of your organization

Enter the number of full-time employees in the country for your company. This does not include those who work in your local branch. The full-time employee is someone who works 30 hours per week or more.

Enter “0” if there are no part-time employees in your company.

13. Address of postal address

Please enter the mailing address of your organization to which correspondence and payments will be sent.

This information will be made public on Job Bank.

14. The address of the job activity. Please explain why the address is different than that in box 13.

If the address of the youth is not the same as the mailing address, enter the main address. This address must not be a PO Box (post office box), but it must be a municipal address. Please explain if the postal address and the location of the proposed activities differ.

This information will be made public on Job Bank.

Important: The employer must provide the job in the area for which the application was submitted. This applies to cases in which the youth will work remotely or far from their supervisor, or from another location than a traditional workplace.

Service Canada must be notified if the proposed location changes after you submit an application. You (as the employer), and Service Canada must agree to the change if it occurs after your funding approval. Otherwise, the job could be deemed ineligible.

If work is to be done remotely or at a location other than the supervisor’s, it is your responsibility to ensure that the location complies with provincial and municipal laws regarding work in non-commercial buildings or areas (e.g. maximum number of employees).

15. If the proposed activities will take place in multiple locations, will they be held within the same constituency?

You must ensure that the activities are located in the same area if they will be held in multiple places. Input all other addresses where youth will be working. These addresses cannot be PO Boxes (post office boxes).

If the proposed activities are located in multiple constituencies, submit a separate application. Consult the Elections Canada website to determine which constituency the activities will be held.

16. Have you or will you be applying for funding from other sources for the job?

Before you check the box, please refer to Section 13.1(c), Canada Summer Jobs Articles of Agreement.

If “yes”, and the Canada Summer Jobs funding requested exceeds $100,000, then you will need to complete Section 8.1 of Canada Summer Jobs Articles of Agreement. This must be attached to your paper application.

17. Is your organization liable to any amount to Canada’s Government?

Before you check the box, please refer to Section 13.1(e).

If “yes”, you will need to indicate the amount due, the nature of debt and the agency or department to which it is owed. Service Canada will check whether any amounts are owed by your organization in its Departmental Accounts Receivable System.

Your organization is not ineligible for funding if it owes money to Canada. If your application is approved, however, any amounts your organization owes the government could be deducted from the contributions you would otherwise receive.

18. Indicate if your organization owes any amount to Canada.

19. Safety and health practices (mandatory).

You must have safety measures in place. The safety and health of your organization will be assessed in relation to its work environment, job type, and activities. Service Canada will evaluate each case individually, and compare the risks to the benefits for youth. Please indicate whether or not you have taken steps to make your workplace safe and healthy.

Next, use the check-boxes to identify the safety and health practices that you have used from the following options.

Information on the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System, (WHMIS). WHMIS is Canada’s national hazard communication standard. In their respective jurisdictions, all federal, provincial and territorial agencies responsible for occupational safety have set WHMIS employer requirements. Employer requirements require that hazardous substances used, stored, handled, or disposed in the workplace are properly labeled and Safety Data Sheets be made available to workers. Workers also receive education and training to ensure safe handling, storage, handling, and disposal of controlled products in their work environment.

List of workplace hazards

Safety in the workplace: Training and supervision require you to demonstrate safe work practices. This includes a good understanding of safety procedures and knowledge about how to use tools and equipment safely.

You are responsible for providing certifications and training: If the job activity is required to be safe, you must provide the certifications and training.

Demonstrating proper COVID-19 prevention steps: Employers are responsible in the current context COVID-19 for keeping abreast of provincial guidance and municipal, provincial, and federal public information about health and following all local guidance. To support employees and employers, you can also consult the following federal resources:

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), for employees and businesses

Guidelines for making informed decisions in the workplace and business sector during the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Provide job-specific safety training. As an employer, it is your responsibility to ensure that your employees are properly trained, supervised, and informed in order to do their jobs safely. For more information, visit the Workplace Safety page of Canada.

Conducting regular safety inspections: These checks help to ensure that safety and occupational hazards are addressed before they lead to injuries. For more information, please visit the Workplace Safety page of Canada.

Safety equipment: You, the employer, are responsible for providing the appropriate PPE to protect your workers from the hazards of the workplace. For more information, visit the Occupational Health and Safety page of Canada.

A plan for emergency response and preparedness: This includes all activities such as procedures, contacts lists, and plans that are made in preparation for a possible emergency.

Other: Please use the text box to describe any other safety and health practices that you may have used.

You are required to ensure that the job is done in a safe environment.

The Articles of Agreement stipulate that the Employer must comply with all laws, by-laws, and regulations applicable to the project, including any labour regulations in the territory or province where employment is located, as well as any environmental legislation, accessibility legislation, and any legislation regarding privacy and information protection. Before the project can begin, the Employer must obtain all permits, licenses or consents necessary for the execution of the project.

20.  Work environment (mandatory)

It is obligatory to create a workplace that encourages inclusion and is free from harassment and discrimination. Please let us know if you have established policies and procedures to ensure harassment and discrimination-free hiring practices.

Next, use the check boxes to identify the practices that you have used from the following options.

  • Hiring policies / practices
  • Discrimination policies / practices
  • Harassment policies / practices
  • Conflict resolution policies / practices
  • Training for employees and/or managers
  • Policies / practices regarding accessibility and accommodation
  • Policies and practices for employment equity
  • Privacy policies / practices
  • Other: When you select this box, please use the textbox to describe any other practices that you have used to create an inclusive workplace free from harassment and discrimination

The Articles of Agreement stipulate that the project cannot include activities or projects that are not:

You can restrict your access to services or programs, or make discriminatory remarks, contrary to the applicable laws. These prohibited grounds include sex, genetic characteristics and religion, race, color, mental or physical disability or sexual orientation.

  • Advocate intolerance, discrimination, and/or prejudice
  • Actively work to restrict or undermine a woman’s ability to access sexual and reproductive health services.

Part B – Job details

This section must be in chronological order. You must also list the job titles you are applying for. You must describe each job only once if you plan to hire multiple youths for the same job title.

If you’re applying for more than 2 job titles, and you use a paper application to submit your application, you will need to copy the entire Job Details section and attach it with your application. You can answer any question on a separate sheet if there isn’t enough space.

Service Canada must assign each youth who is hired with CSJ funding to one of the jobs. Your job application must include the details of the job, such as job title, hourly wages, tasks, and responsibilities. Service Canada must be notified if you wish to make changes to the job details.

If at least one of these details is different, a job is considered to be different: job title, tasks, responsibilities, hourly wages, number of weeks, hours per week, preferred education level, or preferred level of education, then a job is considered to be unique. Salaried jobs must be calculated at an hourly wage rate. Your application may not be approved for all jobs.

21. The Job Title

Please enter the job title and hourly wage for each job you are applying for funding.

Fillable Forms or Grants and Contributions Online Services will allow you to apply. The form will use predictive text to assist you in filling out the job title. Start by typing your job title, and then choose the best option.

If you’re applying by paper, please choose your job title from the list.

This information will be made public on Job Bank.

Code for the National Occupational Classification

The National Occupational Classification (Nordic Occupational Classification) is Canada’s national reference for occupations. It includes more than 30,000 occupational titles, organized by skill levels and types.

The Fillable Form and Grants and Contributions Online Service will automatically choose the right code for you based on the job title.

If you apply by paper, you don’t need to identify a National Occupation Classification Code. If you choose “Other”, please identify the National Occupational Classification Code applicable to the job activity. To locate the correct code, enter the job title in the Quick Search box at the top of this page. This will generate a list with possible occupations. The job description, education, main duties, and employment requirements must be matched when reviewing the possible occupations.

A FAQ is available. Service Canada can be reached for more information.

This information will be made public on Job Bank.

Hourly wage rate

Pay at least the minimum wage applicable at the time you are employed, as determined by provincial or territorial regulations.

Notice:

There may be multiple minimum wages in some provinces or territories, depending on the experience and age of the employees. You are responsible for verifying the minimum wage at the point of employment.

For more information, please refer to Section 3 – Screening to Eligibility.

This information will be made public on Job Bank.

Responsibilities and tasks

Please list the responsibilities and tasks of the youth. Service Canada must be notified if the job’s tasks or responsibilities change after you submit your funding application. Service Canada must approve of any job change that occurs after funding approval. Otherwise, funding may not be available for the job.

Service Canada must approve any changes to the project if COVID-19 restrictions are placed on the project. Service Canada must approve all changes.

Eligible job activities are required. For more information, please refer to Section 3 – Screening and Eligibility.

Skills development plan

To identify the skills the youth will learn during this placement, select one or more of these checkboxes:

Client Service – professional and effective communications

Interaction with others – Teamwork

Communication – the exchange of thoughts and information

Digital Skills – Skills to understand and use digital tools, applications and systems

Leadership is a combination of communication skills, delegating ability, and honesty.

Other – In the provided space, add additional skills

See Section 4 – Assessment Criteria for more details.

Required language(s) for job

Choose English, French or Other. Please indicate Other if you need it in the textbox.

This information will be made public on Job Bank.

Supervision plan (mandatory)

You must submit each of these mandatory pieces of information in order to be eligible:

The title of supervisor

Types of supervision (On-site or Remote, Combination);

Frequency of supervision (Daily/Weekly, Less than once per Week).

Please use the check boxes provided to complete the application.

The supervisor’s supervisory experience (Less Than One Year, One to Two Years, More than Two Years).

Type of feedback required (Formal, Informal);

Formal feedback is given during scheduled meetings. It is written and in response to previously established work objectives. Unscheduled meetings provide informal feedback. It is primarily verbal and does not address previously established work objectives.

What the supervisor will do (Job-specific Training, Work Instructions and Tasks, Evaluation of Work, and/or Other).

Notice:

Mentor and supervisor are not necessarily the same person.

Remote access

You must ensure that the youth is supported in their search for meaningful work experiences by providing sufficient supervision and training. It is important that you ensure that your youth have the opportunity to work with others, build interpersonal skills, and learn about the working environment protocols.

Mentoring plan (mandatory)

Mentoring is an interaction between an experienced employee (the mentor), and a less-experienced employee (the youth). Regular meetings will allow the mentor to learn about the career goals of the youth. They also share their professional experiences to support their skills development, help them enter the labour market, and facilitate their career advancement.

You must submit each of these mandatory pieces of information in order to be eligible:

Titular of mentor

Type (One-on-one, Team);

Frequency of mentoring (Weekly or Monthly, less than once per month)

Please use the check boxes provided on the application form to provide additional information.

The mentor’s experience in mentoring (less than one year, less than one to two years, more than two years).

Mentor-mentee relationship (Formal or Informal);

Mentor-mentee relationships will be formal and have regular meetings. They will also establish career-development goals for their youth. Informal mentor-mentee relationships will not have regular meetings and may not have established career goals.

What the mentor will offer (Support for skill development, Career-related Training, Access to learning materials or Other)

Notice:

Mentor and supervisor are not necessarily the same person.

Work experience

To indicate whether the job offers a career-related experience, check a box. The job is “career-related”, meaning it provides youth with work experience that is related to their current or future studies.

Next, select a checkbox that indicates if your organization plans to retain the youth employee after the Canada Summer Jobs agreement ends.

Participant’s preferred level of education

Make sure to check the box.

Not a factor in assessing the potential youth’s education level. All youth between 15 and 30 years old are eligible to apply for Canada Summer Jobs, regardless of their education level or student status.

This information is collected to monitor and report on the activities of this website.

This information will be made public on Job Bank.

Priorities at the national level

To indicate whether the job is a priority for the country, select a checkbox.

If yes, please indicate the national priorities that are supported by this job. You can also check additional boxes to indicate Priority 1 or Priority 3.

See Section 4 – Assessment Criteria for details.

Priorities at the local level

To indicate whether the job is a priority in your area, click on the checkbox.

If yes, you can use the textbox to indicate the priority or priorities that are local to the job. On the Canada Summer Jobs website, you can find the local priorities for the constituency where the proposed activities will be held.

Notice:

It is not required that Members of Parliament establish local priorities. If your Member has not set local priorities, you can select “No”. You won’t be penalized in assessment if your Member hasn’t.

See Section 4 – Assessment Criteria for details

Part C – Funding required

Calculation of the employer’s total cost, including any contribution required

Notice:

Only five job titles can be included on the paper application form. You must submit a copy of Calculation of Employer’s Total Cost Including Contribution page if you apply for more than five job titles. After you have completed all information, add the total columns to the “Total” line at the bottom. You can avoid this limitation by electronically submitting your application (using the Online Fillable Form, GCOS).

22(a). 22(a).

Each job title that you are applying for funding should be listed. List the job titles in the same order that you list them in the Job Details section.

22(b). 22(b).

Please enter the number of youth that you require for each job title.

22(c). 22(c).

Input the date you would like the youth to start working. The earliest date for employment is April 26, 2021. The job’s last date of expiration is February 26, 2022.

The approval of Service Canada is required before you can hire the youth. Also, the youth cannot begin the job before that date. This means that you would not have paid Canada Summer Jobs contributions if a youth was hired before Service Canada has approved it. The youth costs are not eligible for reimbursement under the Attestation or section 12.1 of these Articles of Agreement. “The Job(s) wouldn’t be created without the financial support provided by this Agreement.”

This information will be made public on Job Bank.

22(d). 22(d).

You must enter the number of weeks you require funding. It should be between six to twenty-three weeks. While you are encouraged to hire the youth for longer periods than requested, reimbursements will only be made for the approved period of your CSJ-2021 funding. You will be awarded additional points if the youth is retained beyond the CSJ agreement.

22(e). 22(e).

Input the hours that the youth will need to work each week. You can choose to work full-time, part-time (from 12 to 40 hours per week).

22(f). 22(f). Hourly wage payable to participant

Input the hourly wage, including any contribution from Service Canada or other sources that will be paid to the youth.

This information will be made public on Job Bank.

For more information, please refer to Section 3 – Screening to Eligibility.

Important

You are responsible for ensuring that the youth is paid, as well as making necessary remittances related to pay to the CRA. This is in accordance to labour regulations in the territory or province where the youth is employed, and according to section 31 of the Articles of Agreement.

22(g). Hourly wage required

Non-profit organizations are eligible for funding up to 100% of the provincial and territorial adult minimum hourly wages. Both public and private sector employers can receive funding up to 75% off the adult minimum hourly wage in their province or territory. This Guide’s Screening for Eligibility section provides more information.

22(h). Mandatory Employment Related Costs, (MERCs), requested (if applicable).

Non-profit employers can be reimbursed for MERCs up to 100% of the minimum wage for adults in the territory or province where the activities are taking place. All other employers are ineligible for funding to cover MERCs in part or whole.

Indicate “0” if you are a public or private sector employer.

For more information, please refer to Section 3 – Screening to Eligibility.

22(i). 22(i).

Use this formula to calculate the total amount of contribution required:

(Column D x Column E x Column G) + Column H

(Number Of Participants Requested x Number of Weeks Requested x Numbers Hours Per Week Requested + Hourly Wage Required) + MERCs

This total will automatically be calculated if you apply online.

22 (j). 22 (j).

Use this formula to calculate the amount you will contribute towards the hiring of a youth.

((Column D) x Column E)x Column F) = Column I

((Number Of Weeks Required x Number of Hours Per Week) x Hourly Wage To Be Paid to Youth) – Total Contribution Required

This total will automatically be calculated if you apply online.

Attestation

To confirm your signature, check the box “I Attest” when you submit your application.

I have read and understood the Canada Summer Jobs Articles of Agreement.

I am authorized, permitted and approved to submit this application for myself and my company.

Without financial assistance under a possible contribution agreement, the job wouldn’t be created.

Canada Summer Jobs funding will not be used for any purpose other than to protect or undermine rights in Canada.

To “undermine” or restrict means to limit or weaken the rights protected by law in Canada.

Notice:

For the application to be considered complete, it must be attested (either on paper or online). You must tick this box if you submit your online application. Otherwise, the system won’t allow you to continue. This box must be checked if you submit a paper application.

Your project could be denied funding if it is not in compliance with the program eligibility criteria or the Articles of Agreement.

False or misleading information can affect eligibility, and funding could be withdrawn.

23-28. Name of the representative(s) of the organization

If approved by Service Canada, Canada Summer Jobs applications form part of the agreement between Service Canada and the organization. The Canada Summer Jobs Articles of Agreement will apply to the organization. This agreement will require the organization to offer the job at an hourly wage for the hours worked and the weeks specified in the Calculation of Approved Canada Summer Jobs Contribution Amount document. This document will be part of the approval package.

Submission of an application is not an indication that an agreement has been reached. Once an application has been approved and a signed agreement by Service Canada, an official agreement is made between the organization and Canada. Before signing the application, it is crucial that you carefully read the Articles of Agreement and the applicant guide.

It is therefore important that the applicant submits the online or paper application only to authorized persons. Read Section 34 of the Articles of Agreement prior to signature: “The Employer warrants that its representative(s) identified in this Application/Agreement has (have) the authority to enter into an agreement on its behalf and agrees to provide Canada with such evidence of that authorization as Canada may reasonably require.”

Lastly, Follow up

What happens when I submit my application?

Each application that is assessed within a constituency will receive a ranking based on their assessment score. A list of recommended projects will then be created. The list of eligible projects will be sent to each Member of Parliament. MPs will be able to review the projects that have been assessed for their constituencies based on their local circumstances and priorities. They can also provide feedback to ensure that local priorities are being met.

Service Canada will notify you about the status of your request beginning in April 2021. All funding and eligibility decisions will be made in writing. If you have applied through GCOS, you can check the status of your request via GCOS.

Application/agreement

After your application has been approved, you will receive the “Calculation of Approved Canada summer jobs contribution amount” document signed by the appropriate delegated authority in Canada. You will also receive other forms and the contact information to answer any questions regarding your agreement.

Before your project has been approved, both the recipient as well as Service Canada must sign an agreement. Service Canada does not consider receipt of an application as a guarantee of funding. Service Canada will not accept your application until funding has been approved. A formal agreement must be signed by Service Canada. Service Canada will inform you by writing about the outcome of the review.

Service Canada can verify financial information with Canada Revenue Agency if there are any financial irregularities.

A signature may be required if you submit an online application.

Notice: Employers who are successful may be randomly selected to undergo inspections or audits according to section 20.2 of these Articles of Agreement.

Privacy statement

Your information is used under the Department of Employment and Social Development Act (DESDA). This information could be used to determine eligibility for Canada Summer Jobs, for its administration, and for accountability. Refusal or delay in providing information could result in Canada Summer Jobs applications not being funded.

This information can also be used to assist in the administration and enforcement of other programs, including Service Canada, of Employment and Social Development Canada (the Department) or ESDC.

Your information may be used to conduct policy analysis, evaluation and/or research. These activities may require the use of multiple sources of information that are under the Department’s custody and control.

These additional uses or disclosures of personal information do not lead to an administrative decision.

When determining eligibility, the Department might review previous Canada Summer Jobs funding agreements. When determining eligibility, the Department can also look at information in the public domain. This includes materials from your website and media articles.

If your application is deemed eligible, your information will be shared with the Member of Parliament in accordance to the law. This will ensure that local priorities are taken into consideration. The Member of Parliament may use it to notify employers about Canada Summer Jobs funding approvals. Your Member of Parliament and the Department may also use this information to promote the program.

Canada Summer Jobs will list funded employers and Job Bank will post funded positions.

The Department will disclose any information it has in its possession, subject to exemptions under the Access to Information Act.

You have the right of access and protection to your personal data. It will be kept in Personal Information Bank ESDC POPU 706. The government publication Info Source, which is available online, contains instructions on how to obtain this information. Info Source can also be accessed at any Service Canada Centre. The Privacy Commissioner of Canada has the authority to investigate the handling of your personal data by ESDC. REF

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *